Pages

Sunday, April 12, 2015

No-Egg Waffles (AIP, Coconut-Free, Paleo, Vegan)




Recently I got my very first bag of Otto's Cassava Flour. Filled with excitement, I contemplated what to make first. My mind began swirling with ideas. I decided to make something, that was not these waffles. It turned out pretty good, but needed another go.

Then I had a thought, let's see if I can make waffles with the flour. My goal was to try and come up with a recipe that was simple and that many could enjoy. The first try was a complete success. There was fluff, there was flavor, there was a waffle I could enjoy! So of course I had to share it with you all as soon as possible.




No-Egg Waffles 


Ingredients


  • 1 and 1/4 cup cassava flour
  • ¼ teaspoon arrowroot starch
  • 1 ¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons avocado oil
  • Up to 1 and 1/4 cup of cold water

Instructions


  1. Preheat waffle iron.
  2. Mix dry ingredients together in a large bowl.
  3. Make a small hole in the dry ingredients and pour in the wet ingredients minus the water. Slowly add in the water a 1/4 cup at a time until it because slush like. You don't want it too soupy (pancake like) but thicker than that. If it becomes too wet, add a little more cassava flour.
  4. Grease waffle iron and pour in mix to suitable size portions for machine.
  5. Let them cook for just a minute or two past the timer.
  6. Enjoy with syrup, fresh fruit or your favorite toppings.
These are definitely more dense than my other recipe, but are more waffle like. This recipe made about 6-8 waffles, depending on the size.




Featured on AIP Recipe Roundtable



27 comments:

  1. I have to try this! Did you use tapioca flour as in ground tapioca or tapioca starch?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Irac! You definitely should try it. This uses cassava flour which is different from tapioca flour/starch. Ottos Cassava Flour (which I used in this recipe) explains it as "Tapioca is the bleached and extracted starch of the cassava root. Otto’s Cassava Flour is a whole food! It is the whole root; peeled, dried, and ground. Otto’s Cassava Flour and tapioca flour/starch have very different actions in both baking and your digestive system." Hope this makes sense! - Alexandra

      Delete
    2. Hi Alexandra,
      thanks for the info! I have both tapioca flour and starch at home, so I'm definitely trying them tomorrow! :D Yey waffles! Thank you so much!

      Delete
    3. FYI for anyone else reading this: Tapioca flour and tapioca starch are the same product. If it's the whole cassava root it will say cassava flour on the label instead.

      Delete
    4. Yes! Thanks Dana for that simple explanation. - Alex

      Delete
  2. Any substitutes for cream of tartar? What's its' purpose in recipes?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The cream of tartar, along with the baking soda and arrowroot flour make the baking powder replacement. You may be able to just use 1 to 1 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda. I have not tried it, but let me know how it goes if you do.

      Delete
    2. The cream of tartar adds a touch of acidity in recipes that don't have a lot (or any) acid, since you need acid to activate the baking soda. (Think how vinegar and baking soda behave together.) If you don't have cream of tartar you could add a small amount of vinegar or lemon juice to activate the soda. Just adding extra soda isn't going to solve the basic problem* of not having acid in the other recipe ingredients.

      [*Pardon the chemistry pun. Basic... base... acid... get it? Haha.]

      Delete
    3. Haha, nice chemistry pun Dana! And thanks for explaining the science behind it. It should like vinegar or lemon juice will be the perfect sub for cream of tartar.

      Delete
  3. Could you make pancakes out of this mix?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I believe it's possible. I know someone tried it by adding a little more water to the mix to get a more pancake batter. However, I have not tried it yet myself.

      Delete
  4. just made these with great success!! so yummy!!! even my in-laws who eat SAD were so impressed with this "healthy" food and asked if i would leave them the recipe!! so happy! so good!! thank you!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay!!! I am so excited to hear this Colleen. So happy they turned out great and you even had some none AIP/Paleo people enjoy them. That is so awesome. Thanks for sharing the positive feedback!

      Delete
  5. Has anyone else had to,use more water? I1/4'cups made crumble. Now with enough water I've had to cook 3-4 min longer and still soupy in the center????

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have had to use a little more water one time, and less water another time. I definitely think the humidity in the air effects the mix. The is why it was hard to say an exact amount. If the mix is to wey after cooking, you may have actually added too much water. Hope you have better success with this recipe.

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  6. Mine were gummy inside. I guess I didn't add enough water. 😞

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are going to be a little gummy, that is the cassava flour. You may want to cook them a little longer. Or I have heard some finish them off in the toaster.

      Delete
  7. Any alternatives to avocado oil, please? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, you could use olive oil or coconut oil.

      Delete
  8. These turned out really gummy for me unfortunately. Even when I get the outside almost too crisp, the inside was still gummy. I cooked the whole batch and will try rehearing the rest in the toaster, hopefully that will help

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sorry they were really gummy. There will be some gumminess as that is just how cassava flour bakes, but it shouldn't be too much. What type of waffle iron do you have? Many have found the belgium waffle irons work better because it distributes the heat more evenly.

      Delete
  9. could you use coconut flour instead of cassava flour?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No. Cassava and coconut flour act very differently. You would likely need to use a combo of several flours to get the similar texture cassava creates. The only flour you *might be able use would maybe be tigernut, but it would probably be a different amount and I have not tested it.

      Delete
  10. These are so great! So nice to have something that doesn't require a fresh plantain. I didn't think the inside was too gummy, but I'm glad I was careful with the water and allowed them to cook a bit longer, too, so the outside was nice and crispy. Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete